The Invention of the Modern Dog: Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain (Animals) (Paperback)

The Invention of the Modern Dog: Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain (Animals) By Michael Worboys, Julie-Marie Strange, Neil Pemberton Cover Image

The Invention of the Modern Dog: Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain (Animals) (Paperback)

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The story of the thoroughly Victorian origins of dog breeds.

For centuries, different types of dogs were bred around the world for work, sport, or companionship. But it was not until Victorian times that breeders started to produce discrete, differentiated, standardized breeds.

In The Invention of the Modern Dog, Michael Worboys, Julie-Marie Strange, and Neil Pemberton explore when, where, why, and how Victorians invented the modern way of ordering and breeding dogs. Though talk of breed was common before this period in the context of livestock, the modern idea of a dog breed defined in terms of shape, size, coat, and color arose during the Victorian period in response to a burgeoning competitive dog show culture. The authors explain how breeders, exhibitors, and showmen borrowed ideas of inheritance and pure blood, as well as breeding practices of livestock, horse, poultry and other fancy breeders, and applied them to a species that was long thought about solely in terms of work and companionship.

The new dog breeds embodied and reflected key aspects of Victorian culture, and they quickly spread across the world, as some of Britain's top dogs were taken on stud tours or exported in a growing international trade. Connecting the emergence and development of certain dog breeds to both scientific understandings of race and blood as well as Britain's posture in a global empire, The Invention of the Modern Dog demonstrates that studying dog breeding cultures allows historians to better understand the complex social relationships of late-nineteenth-century Britain.

Michael Worboys is an emeritus professor in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine at the University of Manchester. He is the coauthor of Rabies in Britain: Dogs, Disease and Culture, 1830-2000. Julie-Marie Strange is a professor of British history at Durham University. She is the author of Death, Grief and Poverty in Britain, 1870-1914. Neil Pemberton is a Senior Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine at the University of Manchester. He is the coauthor of Murder and the Making of English CSI.
Product Details ISBN: 9781421443294
ISBN-10: 1421443295
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication Date: March 15th, 2022
Pages: 304
Language: English
Series: Animals